Tag: 1990s

June 25, 2024
Let There be Light

Let There be Light

Being no stranger to post-Soviet 1990s hunger, poverty, and instability in central Russia, Maria Gunko learns about the Armenian experience of the “cold and dark years” at a 2016 exhibit at Yerevan’s History Museum, and is astonished by how little is known about these events outside of Armenian society. In her latest piece, Gunko explores the happiness that comes when the electricity comes.

January 28, 2019
Dokhtur’s Artsakh Fairytale

Dokhtur’s Artsakh Fairytale

When the war broke out in Artsakh in the early 1990s, Aida Serobyan was a 36-year-old doctor and mother of three. She decided to volunteer for two months as a field doctor, but ended up staying for two years until the end of the war in 1994. Although she helped to heal the injured, she herself was wounded four times on the battlefield. This is her story.

April 30, 2018
Նոր 1988 է արդյոք 2018-ը

Is 2018 the New 1988?

In this new piece, Mikayel Zolyan writes about the similarities and differences between the 1988 Karabakh Movement and the 2018 Velvet Revolution - what it meant for people then and now and lessons to be learned.

April 6, 2018
Բարձրաձայն մտորումներ

1988: Thoughts Spoken Aloud

Vardges Baghryan, a journalist from Artsakh recounts his personal memories from the Karabakh Movement and the war. He recalls the siege on the village of Karintak and how the future freedom and independence of the people of Artsakh was forged.

February 27, 2018
There is Now a Statue of a Dove in Sumgait

There is Now a Statue of a Dove in Sumgait

Deciding never to use the word Genocide and then coming face-to-face with it again in a new context; between reading biographies of the victims of the Sumgait Pogrom over and over again and the urge to see who now occupies the homes of the Armenians of Baku and Sumgait, writer Lusine Hovhannesyan unexpectedly discovers a common yet obvious thread.

February 19, 2018
Իմ «ղարաբաղյան շարժումը»

My “Karabakh Movement”

Journalist Lusine Hovhannesyan recounts her personal memories as a university student during the first days of the Karabakh Movement. She writes, “We became beautiful and fell in love easily like young men and women living out their last days at the barricades and we sang songs of resilience in the streets of Yerevan.”